Grigori Guitchounts

Idolatry in Science

Gary Marcus recently celebrated Noam Chomsky in an essay about the famous linguist’s life and influence on the field of linguistics over the past fifty years. There is no doubt that Chomsky has had tremendous impact on American intellectual life over the years, from work on language to political and philosophical ideas. However, Gary Marcus’s description of Chomsky’s influence on the… Read more →

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A couple of weeks ago in the New York Times, David Ewing Duncan wrote an article, “How Science Can Build a Better You,” describing a brain-machine interface called Braingate that supposedly uses a tiny bed of “electrons” to read out brain activity. Scientists recently described this device’s ability to decode neural signals to control a prosthetic arm; this and other devices promise to restore mobility in paralyzed or tetraplegic patients.

However, the Braingate device actually used an array of electrodes rather than electrons. An electron is a subatomic particle that carries negative charge; the flow of electrons is the basis of electrical stimulation. Electrodes, on the other hand, are wires that measure changes in electrical potential.

While the spelling difference is trivial, the semantic error is significant. Writing about science is a challenge for those who have no training in science, as is copy-editing; the complexity of science should require journalists to reach a level of expertise in their field before bringing their reports to the world. On the opposing side, American readers should have the basic education in science to know the difference between electrodes and electrons, and should not be at risk of being branded as nerds for pointing out such mistakes. Investment in early childhood education is critical for basic science knowledge, and the upcoming presidential election will determine if Americans choose “electrodes” over “electrons”.

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The Daily Show aired a special report by Aasif Mandvi on “an expensive lesson about bringing fish back to life,” or the dangers of leaving children with the capability to make purchases on the Apple App Store. The point of this story is that children can’t inhibit behavior as well as adults can due to their underdeveloped frontal cortices; and are therefore vulnerable targets to those whose sole purpose is to make easy money, not unlike drug dealers selling to addicts who just can’t help themselves:

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Christopher Hitchens writes in the January edition of Vanity Fair about what he believes to be a nonsensical maxim: “What doesn’t kill me, makes me stronger.” Hitchens is suffering from esophageal cancer, the primary reason for the sentiment that he is not becoming “stronger,” but is rather on a terminal decline.

The phrase is attributed to Nietzsche, whose mental decline late in life, Hitchens notes, probably did not make him any stronger. Nor did the philosopher Sydney Hook consider himself stronger after a terrible experience in a hospital. Hitchens considers himself to be among the many who don’t conquer illness to come out stronger. But there is a flaw in this reasoning – the first condition to becoming stronger is to not be killed. Hitchens is thankfully still alive and kicking (i.e. writing), but he hasn’t defeated his cancer (yet, hopefully); it is only after the cancer is over with that Hitchens can say he’s stronger or weaker. Now is premature. The more important qualification is that “stronger” should mean mentally stronger, not physically. Diseases that target the mind specifically, like Nietzsche’s syphilis, should be discounted; all others should hopefully be an exercise for the power of will and mental fortitude.

Whenever you think life is hard, remember Hitchens and countless others who brave horrible diseases. Stay stark, Hitch!

Hitchens’s essay may be found here.

Science, Religion and Values: Magisteria Redefined

Science and religion have been archenemies for some time now, with one on a quest for knowledge and truth, and the other seeking to fill a perceived void of meaning in lives. Logical inspection confirms the two systems are incompatible with one another, since science requires evidence for all claims, whereas religion insists on faith when there is no evidence… Read more →

Brainy Computers

“We’re not trying to replicate the brain. That’s impossible. We don’t know how the brain works, really,” says the chief of IBM’s Cognitive Computing project, which aims to improve computing by creating brain-like computers capable of learning in real-time and consuming less power than conventional machines. No one knows how the brain works, but have the folks at IBM tried… Read more →

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Science is difficult to understand and even more difficult to explain. John Bohannon thinks that words are inept at explaining scientific concepts, and should stay out of the way. Powerpoint is useless too. Instead, Bohannon argues, scientific concepts should be explained with dance. He foresees a boost to the economy if dancers were to be hired as aids to presenters, not only because those dancers would have jobs, but because science would be communicated more effectively, leading to more innovation.

Bohannon presents these ideas in an engaging TEDx talk, with the help of the Black Label Movement dance team.  No doubt, seeing people dance out cellular locomotion is fun and more straightforward than hearing a verbal description of the same thing. I wonder though if such concepts would be more accurately portrayed and easier to understand through animations. Perhaps there is something about seeing people perform live that is more engaging than seeing animations or the same performance on a screen. If that’s true, then having dancers at one’s presentations would be very helpful (it would also make that presentation stand out, if no one else has dancers).